Happy Thanksgiving-mapping where your thanksgiving food came from

We all basically go to the local Publix or market to gather all of our basics for our Thanksgiving feast.  But if you have ever wondered where those great goodies have their origins, click this link to see this cool story map from ESRI. 

Where did my Thanksgiving meal come from-ESRI

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This World Map Is So Accurate It Folds Into a Globe (Map projections)

It’s a problem that has plagued cartographers for centuries: How do you accurately represent a round world on a flat map?

The most common world map used today, designed almost 450 years ago, is highly distorted—it’s that classroom wall map that shows Greenland as absolutely colossal. But a new map called AuthaGraph, created by Tokyo-based artist and architect Hajime Narukawa, just won Japan’s distinguished Good Design Award for accurately representing the relative sizes of landmasses and bodies of water on Earth. The map is so proportionally accurate that you can fold it up into a three-dimensional globe.

The rest of the article can be found here:  This World Map Is So Accurate It Folds Into a Globe

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What can GIS (Geographic Information System) do for your business?

Over the past 10 plus years, I have been blessed to learn a skill that has a multitude of uses from oil and gas exploration (where I first learned and used GIS) to archaeology  and environmental (my current GIS consulting area).  But GIS has a wide range of uses that can be used cross-platform and cross-industries.  Take, for example, health care and business.  Walgreens is a heavy GIS user that has integrated the use and practice of GIS to be able to predict within a day or two where influenza outbreaks are occurring.  The CDC is usually a week or more in detecting the outbreaks and occurrences of influenza.

Why Walgreens uses interactive maps plus analytics to evaluate store locations

 

Also another great article:   WalMap: The App By Walgreens That Maps Out Community Trends in Real Time

Mapping Every Disputed Territory in the World (by Max Galka)

One of a maps first set of purposes was to show troop movement and or territorial boundaries during ancient times.   The would show the land owned by a King or nobleman and sometimes those very same maps would cause a dispute which resulted in war.  Check out this article on how Google Maps and other map applications change the boundaries based upon a person IP address or geographical location.  Talk about political correctness.

Here is a portion of the article:

Some of the biggest geopolitical events in the world are centered around disputed territories, land whose sovereignty is claimed by more than one nation / occupying power.

At the other extreme, some territorial disputes involve land that would seem entirely worthless. The U.K., Iceland, and Denmark all assert ownership of Rockall Island, an 8,000 square foot rock in the middle of the North Atlantic, hundreds of miles from the nearest inhabited location.

From one extreme to the other, at least 124 countries (or “would-be” countries) are involved in a territorial dispute of some kind, involving, by my count, 105 separate territories.

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Visualizing the Great Migration — The Most Under-Reported Story of the 20th Century

This is a very insightful map of the Great Migration that occurred in the early 20th century.  No one really has written much about it.  I am interested in the migration pattern of early native North Americans and of the continent as a whole.  I really love this stuff.

Follow the link to read more byMax Galka

In 1910, 83% of African Americans lived in the South, about the same percentage that had lived there since at least as far back as 1790.

In the 60 years that followed, growing racism and a lack of economic opportunities in the South led more than 6 millionAfrican Americans to migrate north. The pull northward was also compounded by World War I, which boosted the demand for northern industry, but left the North with a shortage of workers.

Bike share mapping creates beautiful portraits of London, NYC and Berlin (this is very cool)

Bike sharing isn’t very popular around the Northwest Florida area but it is in larger cities across the globe.  There is a very neat project that shows the real-time bike sharing use across major cities in North America and Europe.  Now, I love riding my bike but for me to be able to get to the office from my home would mean that I would leave the house at 3 in the morning.  But, if I were located in a larger city with an adequate cycling lanes, I would probably be one who commutes by bike.

Follow the link in the quote and see how this project started and what the visuals reveal about the programs.

Thanks to http://metrocosm.com/ for the post on facebook about the article.

Bike sharing programmes have grown from just 24 cities worldwide a decade ago to more than 800 cities today, but how has a 200-year-old device suddenly become the next big thing in urban transport? The key is digital information, the real-time GPS technology that allows the bikes to be tracked and secured, and lets cities monitor how and where they are being used.

What is GIS?

GIS is more than just creating a map and it is more than just data.  GIS is used in many industries and fields of work.  I started out learning GIS and using it when I worked in the oil and gas industry.  I used it with clients to track their assets and oil and gas leases.  I am currently applying GIS in archaeology and history.  There is a myriad of ways to use GIS but just what is GIS.  Follow the link in the below paragraph to peek your curiosity and learn more about this relatively young technology and its application.

 

This is probably the most asked question posed to those in the Geographic Information Systems (GIS) field and is probably the hardest to answer in a succinct and clear manner. GIS is a technological field that incorporates geographical features with tabular data in order to map, analyze, and assess real-world problems.  The key word to this technology is Geography – this means that some portion of the data is spatial.  In other words, data that is in some way referenced to locations on the earth. Coupled with this data is usually tabular data known as attribute data.  Attribute data can be generally defined as additional information about each of the spatial features.  An example of this would be schools. The actual location of the schools is the spatial data.  Additional data such as the school name, level of education taught, student capacity would make up the attribute data.  It is the partnership of these two data types that enables GIS to be such an effective problem solving tool through spatial analysis.

GIS operates on many levels.  On the most basic level, geographic information systems technology is used as computer cartography, that is for straight forward mapping. The real power of GIS is through using spatial and statistical methods to analyze attribute and geographic information.  The end result of the analysis can be derivative information, interpolated information or prioritized information.